Master Mei Juan Luo practicing Tai Chi with students in China

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Luo Mei Juan practises the Chen Style 13 form with students beside the River Yulong at her school in Yangshuo, China. Mei usually finds time once a year to teach in China and in 2011 hosted the Wandering Dao Retreat at her school near the beutiful Yulong River. Students had the opportunity to train in the inspiring setting just outside Yangshuo, in southern China. For more information about Long Tou Shan have a look at the website and make sure you check back for dates of Mei’s next trip to China.

Taiji and Qigong for Immune System Health

Human Immune SystemAnother interesting article from Yang-Sheng e-magazine.

There is considerable evidence that taiji and Qigong can help strengthen your immune system. Doctors do not claim to fully understand what happens, but they do agree that taiji and Qigong help. One way that they may work is by activating our relaxation response. Another way that they may work is by activating our lymphatic system.

Read more here.

Mei’s December Tai Chi Workshop in Boulder, Colorado

Mei's December WorkshopIn December, Mei taught a very successful weekend Tai Chi workshop in Boulder, Colorado.

Seen here some of her students showing a little of what they learned during the intensive two-day session.  Students were able to complete the Tai Chi 18-form.

Afterwards, one of her students wrote to her and said, “The tai chi form feels amazing! Very blissful and peaceful. Thank you for teaching me.”

Slow down your slow motion!

Webmaster Roy enjoyed this piece on Yang Sheng:

If you really want to explore the deeper layers of your mind and how it connects to your body, you have to stand.

When you do your taiji form, you catch glimpses of deeper layers of stillness inside your movements. However, without a standing qigong practice, your taiji form will never give you complete access to the summit.

Imagine being on a hike, when you are just about to cross the tree line and you get a glimpse of the trail leading just a little higher. Before you arrive at the summit of a mountain, you catch glimpses of what lies waiting at the top. As you come closer to the top, a panorama spreads out before you. You breathe in the crisp air at the summit and see other distant peaks out on the horizon.

When you do your taiji form, you also catch glimpses of deeper layers of stillness inside your movements. But here’s the problem, without a standing qigong practice, your taiji form will never give you complete access to the summit. Just like that feeling of being there at the summit, breathing in different air, and gazing out onto the unfolding landscape of still, distant peaks all around you; standing qigong lets you soak in layers and layers of stillness that slow-motion movement can never quite reach.

Read more: Why Your Slow-Motion Movement Practice is Not Slow Enough